Friday, March 31, 2006

Die Echtheit der Inuit-Kunst und der Kunst der Amerikanischen Ureinwohner

Beide Inuitkunst (Eskimo) und Kunst der nordwestlichen Amerikanischen Ureinwohner haben in den letzten Jahrzehnten internationale Anerkennung als wertvolle Kunstformen gewonnen. Jedoch hat ihre steigende Popularität die vermehrte Verbreitung von Nachahmungen und in Serienfertigung hergestellten Imitationen der echten einheimischen Kunst ergeben. Einige offensichtliche Fälschungen werden in Asien hergestellt; die fertigen Stücke werden in Plastik, Harz oder aus keramischem Material gegossen.

Andere Fälschungen von Eskimoschnitzereien der nordwestlichen Amerikanischen Ureinwohner werden aus Stein oder Holz hergestellt. Diese Fälschungen, die schwerer von der authentischen Kunstarbeit zu unterscheiden sind, sind häufig handgeschnitzte Kopien eines ursprünglichen Kunststückes. Werkstätten haben hunderte von illegalen Imitationen ohne die Erlaubnis des Künstlers reproduziert. Die fälschenden Firmen bringen dann ein Etikett an, welches behauptet, daß die Kopien durch einen nordwestlichen Amerikanischen Ureinwohner angefertigt wurden, und fügen ebenfalls Hintergrundinformationen über die Ureinwohnerdesigns und dessen Gestaltungsarbeit zu.

[Die Echtheit der Inuit-Kunst und der Kunst der Amerikanischen Ureinwohner - Next Page]

Free Spirit Gallery Inuitkunst und Kunst der Amerikanischen Ureinwohner - Deutsch

Free Spirit Gallery Inuit Art and Native American Art - English

Thursday, March 30, 2006

Tips on How to Buy and Shop for Authentic Native Indian Art Carvings (Native American Art)

Many visitors to Canada will be exposed to Native Indian art while touring the country, especially in British Columbia. Among this aboriginal artwork are the magnificent hand made Northwest Native Indian art wood carvings by the Canadian aboriginal artists in BC. While in some of the major Canadian cities (Toronto, Vancouver and Montreal) or other tourist areas popular with international visitors such as Banff, Native Indian carvings will be seen at various retail shops and displayed at some museums as well as some public areas such as parks. Since Native Indian art, particularly Pacific Northwest Native Indian art, has been getting more and more international exposure, people may be seeing this aboriginal fine art form at galleries and museums located outside Canada too. As a result, it will be natural for many tourists and art collectors to decide that they would like to purchase Native Indian art as nice souvenirs for their homes or as very unique gifts for others. Assuming that the intention is to acquire an authentic piece rather than a cheap tourist imitation, the question arises on how does one tell apart the real thing from the fakes? It would be pretty disappointing to bring home a piece bought in Vancouver only to find out later that it isn’t authentic or even made in Canada. One would have to be careful in tourist areas where all sorts of other souvenirs such as t-shirts, hockey jerseys, postcards, key chains, maple syrup and other Canadian items are sold.

The safest places to shop for Native Indian art carvings to ensure authenticity are always the reputable galleries that specialize in Canadian Native Indian art. Some of these galleries have advertisements in the city tourist guides found in hotels. Reputable Native Indian art galleries are also listed in magazines which are devoted entirely to Native art such as American Indian Art and Native Peoples magazine. These galleries will usually be located in the downtown tourist areas of major cities. When one walks into these galleries, one will see that there will be only Native Indian art and none of the other usual tourist souvenirs such as t-shirts or postcards. These galleries will have only authentic Native Indian art for sale as they do not deal with imitations or fakes. The carvings are usually signed by the carver.

[for the rest of this article, see How to Shop for Native Indian Art]

Also see Native American Art Carvings

Wednesday, March 29, 2006

New Native American Indian Art Website for German Market

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

New Native American Indian Art Website for German Market

Montreal, Quebec, Canada – March 29, 2006 -- Free Spirit Gallery, a Montreal based online art gallery specializing in northwest Native American Indian art, has launched a new German version of its website. Overseas art customers located in Germany and other parts of German speaking Europe can now browse through the many beautiful pieces of Native art from Canada’s Pacific northwest coast in German.

There has always been a fascination with Native American Indian culture in Germany. There are numerous clubs where Germans explore and enjoy Native American Indian culture. German tourists have enjoyed Canada for its natural scenic beauty especially in the Canadian Rockies. Tourists are exposed to the local Native Canadian Indian art while visiting British Columbia in the west coast. As a result, the local Native art has been very popular acquisitions to bring home to Germany and other European countries. Through Free Spirit Gallery’s website, the Germans can now continue to build their northwest Native Indian art collections from their home country.

The website has an informative article about recognizing authentic Native American Indian artwork from reproductions and fakes. This article in both German as well as English will help educate tourists and novice collectors about Native American Indian art so that they can make wise buying decisions without ending up with just cheap tourist souvenirs.

Clint Leung, who created Free Spirit Gallery in 2004, says, “Our website is extremely informative and as more of the European market discovers us, we intend to translate more of our Native American Indian art articles into German and other languages in the future.”

Because of the limitations of regional exposure, northwest Native American artists have always had difficulties in getting their artwork out to the rest of the world. The modern technology of Free Spirit Gallery is now helping these artists gain much needed international exposure for their beautiful artwork.

For more information, see www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca

About Free Spirit Gallery:

Free Spirit Gallery is an online gallery specializing in northwest Native American art and Eskimo Inuit art including carvings, sculptures as well as prints. Free Spirit Gallery has numerous information resource articles with photos of authentic Native Indian art and Eskimo Inuit art as well as free eCards.

Contact Information:

Clint Leung
Free Spirit Gallery
514-421-1124
http://www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca

###

Tuesday, March 28, 2006

Tips on How to Buy and Shop for Authentic Inuit Art (Eskimo Art) Sculptures

Many visitors to Canada will be exposed to Inuit art (Eskimo art) sculptures while touring the country. These are the magnificent hand made sculptures carved from stone by the Inuit artists living in the northern Arctic regions of Canada. While in some of the major Canadian cities (Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal, Ottawa and Quebec City) or other tourist areas popular with international visitors such as Banff, Inuit sculptures will be seen at various retail shops and displayed at some museums. Since Inuit art has been getting more and more international exposure, people may be seeing this Canadian fine art form at galleries and museums located outside Canada too. As a result, it will be natural for many tourists and art collectors to decide that they would like to purchase Inuit sculptures as nice souvenirs for their homes or as very unique gifts for others. Assuming that the intention is to acquire an authentic piece of Inuit art rather than a cheap tourist imitation, the question arises on how does one tell apart the real thing from the fakes?

It would be pretty disappointing to bring home a piece only to find out later that it isn’t authentic or even made in Canada. If one is lucky enough to be traveling in the Canadian Arctic where the Inuit live and make their wonderful artwork, then it can be safely assumed that any Inuit art piece purchased from a local northern store or directly from an Inuit carver would be authentic. One would have to be more careful elsewhere in Canada, especially in tourist areas where all sorts of other Canadian souvenirs such as t-shirts, hockey jerseys, postcards, key chains, maple syrup and other Native Canadian arts are sold.

The safest places to shop for Inuit sculptures to ensure authenticity are always the reputable galleries that specialize in Canadian Inuit art and Eskimo art. Some of these galleries have advertisements in the city tourist guides found in hotels. Reputable Inuit art galleries are also listed in Inuit Art Quarterly magazine which is devoted entirely to Inuit art. These galleries will usually be located in the downtown tourist areas of major cities. When one walks into these galleries, one will see that there will be only Inuit art and maybe Native art but none of the other usual tourist souvenirs such as t-shirts or postcards. These galleries will have only authentic Inuit art for sale as they do not deal with imitations or fakes. Just to be even safer, make sure that the piece you are interested in comes with a Canadian government Igloo tag certifying that it was hand made by a Canadian Inuit artist. The Inuit sculpture may be signed by the carver either in English or Inuit syllabics but not all authentic pieces are signed. So be aware that an unsigned piece may still be indeed authentic.

Some of these Inuit art galleries also have websites so you could shop and buy authentic Inuit art sculpture from home anywhere in the world. In addition to these street retail specialty galleries, there are now reputable online galleries that also specialize in authentic Inuit art. These online galleries are a good option for buying Inuit art since the prices are usually lower than those at street retail galleries because of lower overheads. Of course, like any other shopping on the internet, one must be careful so when dealing with an online gallery, make sure that their pieces also come with the official Igloo tags to ensure authenticity.

Some tourist shops do carry authentic Inuit art as well as the other touristy souvenirs in order to cater to all types of tourists. When shopping at these types of stores, it is possible to tell apart the real pieces from the reproductions. Authentic Inuit sculpture is carved from stone and therefore should have some weight or mass to it. Stone is also cold to the touch. A reproduction made of plastic or resin from a mold will be much lighter in weight and will not be cold to the touch. A reproduction will sometimes have a company name on it such as Wolf Originals or Boma and will never feature an artist’s signature. An authentic Inuit sculpture is a one of a kind piece of artwork and nothing else on the store shelves will look exactly like it. If there are duplicates of a certain piece with exact details, the piece is not authentic. If a piece looks too perfect in detail with absolute straight bottoms or sides, it is probably not real. Of course, if a piece features a sticker indicating that is was made in an Asian country, then it is obviously a fake. There will also be a huge price difference between authentic pieces and the imitations.

Where it becomes more difficult to determine authenticity are with the reproductions that are also made of stone. This can be a real gray area to those unfamiliar with authentic Inuit art. They do have mass and may even have some type of tag indicating that it was hand made but if there are other pieces on the shelves that look too similar in detail, they are most likely not authentic. If a seller claims that such as piece is authentic, ask to see the official Igloo tag that comes with it which will have information on the artist, location where it was made and the year it was carved. If the Igloo tag is not available, move on. The authentic pieces with the accompanying official Igloo tags will always be the highest priced and are usually kept in a separate (perhaps even locked) shelf within the store.

For further information as well as examples of real compared to fake Inuit art, see the article on Authenticity of Eskimo Art and Inuit Art. For other interesting articles as well, see Inuit Art Information Articles.

For authentic Inuit art and Eskimo art, check out www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca , a reputable online gallery that deals only with authentic artwork.


authentic inuit art eskimo sculpture

Monday, March 27, 2006

West Coast First Nations Art Dolls

There's an artist by the name of Leasa Robson in BC Canada that does really nice West Coast First Nations art dolls made of porcelain. Her work is award winning and on display at the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria, BC. The dolls come complete with authentic First Nations outfits. Her website can be seen at www.westcoastoriginals.ca

For other types of native artwork from this region, see West Coast First Nations Art at the Free Spirit Gallery site.

Friday, March 24, 2006

Inuit Art and Eskimo Art Website Launches New German Pages for Customers in Europe

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Montreal, Quebec, Canada - March 24, 2006 – Free Spirit Gallery, a Montreal based online art gallery specializing in Inuit art and Eskimo art, is going international by launching new German pages for its website. Overseas art customers located in Germany and other parts of German speaking Europe can now browse through the many beautiful pieces of art from Canada’s Arctic north in German. Since the popularity of Canadian Inuit art and Eskimo art has been growing internationally, the new German version of Free Spirit Gallery’s website will make it easier for buyers to shop for pieces without even leaving Europe. Free Spirit Gallery ships artwork from Canada directly to Germany and other overseas countries.

German tourists have always enjoyed Canada for its natural scenic beauty. The Canadian Rockies have also been quite popular with German skiers in recent years. Canadian Inuit art has been popular acquisitions for the Germans and other Europeans during their travels to Canada. Through Free Spirit Gallery’s website, they can now continue to build their Inuit art collections from home back in Germany and other European countries.

There’s even an informative article in the website about recognizing authentic Inuit artwork from reproductions and fakes. This article in both German as well as English, will help educate tourists and novice collectors about Inuit art so that they can make wise buying decisions without ending up with just cheap tourist souvenirs.

Clint Leung, who created Free Spirit Gallery in 2004, says, “Our website is extremely informative and as more of the European market discovers us, we intend to translate more of our information resource articles into German and perhaps other languages in the future.”

Because of the isolation of the Arctic north, Canadian Inuit artists have always had difficulties in getting their artwork out to the rest of the world. Now with the help of Free Spirit Gallery’s new German website, these talented artists can gain much needed exposure for their beautiful work in Germany, the largest consumer market in Europe.

About Free Spirit Gallery:

Free Spirit Gallery is an online gallery specializing in Inuit Eskimo art and Northwest Native American art including carvings, sculptures as well as prints. Free Spirit Gallery has numerous information resource articles with photos of authentic Inuit and Native Indian art as well as free eCards.

Contact Information:

Clint Leung
Free Spirit Gallery
514-421-1124
866-421-1124
http://www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca

###

Thursday, March 23, 2006

Inuit See Signs of Global Warming Up In the Arctic

Here's an article about the Inuit up in the Canadian north seeing signs of global warming in the Arctic region. This article in the Washington Post details some of the observations of the Inuit as well as the effects global warming can have up in the Arctic.

See the Inuit Arctic Global Warming Article

For the latest in beautiful artwork from the north, see Inuit Art from the Arctic.

Wednesday, March 22, 2006

Native American Indian Art Online Store

We have received calls asking on where our location is from customers hoping to visit. This is just to clarify that Free Spirit Gallery is an exclusively online business and does not have a street retail location. As a Native American Indian art online store, we do not have the high overhead expenses as street retail stores and galleries. Therefore, Free Spirit Gallery is able to provide authentic Native American Indian art and Inuit art to the market at 20 to 50 percent off typical retail prices one would find at street retail stores.

If customers are visiting the Montreal area and would like to see certain pieces of artwork, it is possible by special appointment. We can meet customers at their hotels or local homes with Native American Indian artwork pieces of interest.

Just visit our website at www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca to view current available Native American Indian art as well as our contact information.

Monday, March 20, 2006

Authenticity of Inuit Eskimo Art and Native American Indian Art Available in Japanese

This is just to clarify the last post that was in Japanese. It basically is announcing that the article on Authenticity of Inuit Eskimo Art and Native American Art is available in Japanese as well as in English at the Free Spirit Gallery website.


To see the available articles in either language, see;

Inuit Art and Native American Art Information Articles in English

Inuit Art and Native American Art Information Articles in Japanese

イヌイット・エスキモーアートとアメリカ原住民アート

両方ともイヌイット・エスキモーアートとアメリカ原住民アート過去数十年にわたり、価値ある芸術形式としての国際的な認知を得ました。しかしながら、それらの高まる人気は、模造品の急増を増やし、オリジナル原住民アートの複製品が大量生産される結果となりました。明らかに偽物と分かる作品は、プラスチック、樹脂または陶磁器の型から作られています。

他の偽物は、実はアメリカ原住民彫刻を模倣するために、エスキモー彫刻や木製品に真似たキャスト石でできています。これらの偽物は、本物のアートワークと見分けることが更に難しくなっており、しばしば、アートワークのオリジナル作品を複製した、手製の彫刻もあります。ワークショップのなかには、職人の許可なしに、数百部も不法に複製したところもあります。こういった偽造会社は、偽作品が原住民職人によって影響され、アートワークで使われる原住民デザインの背景情報でさえ主張する数種類のタグを付けるでしょう。なかには、偽のエスキモー彫刻の底にイヌイット文字を付け加えることさえあります。

消費者に模造品が本物であり、原住民コミュニティーのための産出している収入であるという印象を与えようとして以来、これらは彼ら側の非常に当てにならない戦略です。偽物や模造品が、本物のイヌイットやアメリカ原住民アートの印象を下げています。正真正銘の原住民アートワークの売り上げが減少し、順に原住民職人から収入を奪うことになりました。著作権使用料は、模造と複製のために、原住民職人へは通常払われません。

明らかに偽物である作品は、簡単に見抜くことができます。例は下に示される、ふくろうのトリオです。それは、エスキモーアート彫刻の模造品です。触っても冷たくないように、石で作られていません。それは、ずっしりとした重みのある石とは違い、非常に軽いです。その作品の詳細と底面は、型に入れて作られたように見えます。底には、Wolf Originalsという会社名の入ったシールさえ付いています。並んで、この作品が買われたお土産店の類似した作品の比較で、全ての作品があらゆる詳細までまったく同じであることが分かりました。そして、それはオリジナルアートワークには不可能なことです。

次のページ - イヌイット・エスキモーアートとアメリカ原住民アート

Free Spirit Gallery 日本語

Saturday, March 18, 2006

Native American Drums

Here's a site that features handmade Native American drums from the Pacific West Coast region;

http://www.geocities.com/drumfiire2002/index.html


For other types of artwork from this region, see Northwest Native American Art.

Thursday, March 16, 2006

Northwest Native Indian Art Totem Pole Returned to Canada

A 134 year old Northwest Native Indian art totem pole is being returned to British Columbia, Canada after being on display for decades at a museum in Stockholm, Sweden. A 15-member delegation of the Haisla Canadian First Nation was on hand in Stockholm to receive the totem pole.

The totem pole was brought to Sweden from Canada in the 1920s. It is believed to be the first time a cultural artifact has been voluntarily returned directly to a Canadian Native Indian group from a collection outside North America.

The Northwest Native Indian Haisla band members beat drums and chanted as the nine-metre totem pole was loaded onto a truck outside Stockholm's Museum of Ethnography.

"The old pole has been set free," said Haisla band spokeswoman Louisa Smith. "It is no longer in shackles."

The Northwest Native Indian Haisla group erected the totem pole in 1872 at the mouth of the Kitlope River, just north of Vancouver Island, to honour their forest spirit for saving the tribe from a smallpox epidemic. It disappeared from the site under mysterious circumstances in the 1920s. A Swedish diplomat is believed to have taken the totem pole back home and donated it to the museum, where it has been on display for 77 years.

In return for the original, the Haisla carved a replacement totem pole for the museum. Smith said the new pole will serve as a symbolic link between the Canadian Native Indian Haisla and the people of Sweden.

The original pole will travel by ship to Vancouver. It will eventually be housed in a Northwest Native Indian cultural centre in Kitimat, B.C.

For more information on these types of majestic Native Indian structures, see Native Indian Totem Poles.

For more Canadian Native art, see Northwest Native Indian Art.

Wednesday, March 15, 2006

Nunavut Musical Special to air on CBC Television

From the ever-audacious Kronos Quartet and Canadian throat singer Tanya Tagaq comes "Nunavut" * a unique collaboration between artists who consistently push the boundaries of their musical genres.

Artistic Director of the Kronos, David Harrington, who has dubbed Tagaq "the Jimi Hendrix of throat singers," has had a longstanding interest in Inuit music. When he heard what he calls "the string quartet inside Tanya's throat," he realized he'd finally found the right collaborator. Tagaq and the Kronos travelled to Whitehorse to create this remarkable work. "Nunavut" is performed entirely without a score, using only tiny squares of coloured paper for inspiration.

Tagaq, who was born in the remote town of Cambridge Bay, taught herself throat singing while studying at the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design in Halifax. She has toured with Bjork and received rave reviews internationally. Her expressive voice is a haunting mix of traditional and non-traditional sounds. The celebrated Kronos Quartet is known as an ensemble for whom innovation and expanding the repertoire of the string quartet is second nature.

The world premiere of "Nunavut" took place at Vancouver's Chan Centre for the Performing Arts on January 28th, 2006. "Nunavut" was taped in the CBC studio in Vancouver for Opening Night. The director was Mark Lawrence who was there in Whitehorse with the Kronos and Tagaq as they created "Nunavut."

"Nunavut" airs on Opening Night on Thursday, March 16, 2006 with "Appassionata," a documentary about the life and work of composer Sophie-Carmen Eckhardt-Grammatté. The evening is hosted by Measha Brueggergosman. "Appassionata" begins at 8 pm and "Nunavut" at 9:40 pm, local time.

Visit www.cbc.ca/openingnight for more information.

For a look at fine arts from Nunavut, see Inuit Sculpture.

Sunday, March 12, 2006

Japanese Inuit Art and Native American Indian Art Website Working Okay

The Japanese Inuit art website for Free Spirit Gallery seems to be working fine and has already been viewed by native Japanese. There is more detail in the English site so one can view both languages if desired. Entry into the Japanese Inuit art site is via the main English home page where there's Japanese characters up at the top of the page as an entry link. Although the shopping cart system for Free Spirit Gallery is still in English, there's a order translation page where Japanese customers can refer to in order to help guide them through the order system.

Each item page of the gallery has a Japanese version and the prices are in American and Canadian dollars but there are approximate Japanese equivalent prices in yen shown as well.

The Japanese pages will make it easier for customers in Japan to browse and shop for Canadian Inuit art and Northwest Native American Indian art from abroad.

Inuit Worried About Ban on Seal Hunts in Canada

CBC News

The president of Greenland's Inuit Circumpolar Conference is worried the sealing industry is reverting back to the 1980s when several European countries banned the import of baby seal pelts.

The ban was the result of pressure from animal rights activists who opposed the annual Newfoundland seal hunt.

Aqqaluk Lynge says people, like singer Paul McCartney, are misleading the public and will have a negative impact on the sealing market.

McCartney recently appeared on CNN's Larry King Live television show to voice his opposition to the Newfoundland seal hunt.

Lynge says some European countries, like Italy and the Netherlands, are now contemplating legislation restricting sealskin imports.

"There's parliamentary movement in Italy, and same in the Dutch Parliament, that are taking up the issue that they did 20 and 30 years ago," says Lynge.

"So, now they are talking again about bans of our products. It is alarming that what we thought that we fought successfully 20 years ago now are again hurting us."

Lynge says Inuit have to work together to combat the animal rights groups.

To see Inuit art of seals, see Inuit Carvings.

Friday, March 10, 2006

北西アメリカ原住民アート - 北西原住民インディアンアート彫刻

ようこそFree Spirit Gallery(フリー・スピリット・ギャラリー)へ。
Free Spirit Gallery(フリー・スピリット・ギャラリー)では、カナダの北極地で雄大な[北西アメリカ原住民アート]から精妙な[イヌイットアート] [エスキモーアート]をご覧にいただくことができます。個々の作品は、信頼すべきオリジナル独創作品でギャラリー・クオリティーです。

このウェブサイトには、多くのお役立ち情報があります- 北西原住民インディアンアート彫刻。Free Spirit Gallery(フリー・スピリット・ギャラリー)のすばらしい作品は、ご自宅やオフィスを一層おしゃれにし、あなたのお客様との会話を盛り立てるものとなるでしょう。また、個人や会社への贈り物としても最適です。

www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca/indexjap.htm 日本語
www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca English


北西アメリカ原住民アート - 北西原住民インディアンアート彫刻

Thursday, March 09, 2006

イヌイットアート エスキモーアート

ようこそFree Spirit Gallery(フリー・スピリット・ギャラリー)へ。
Free Spirit Gallery(フリー・スピリット・ギャラリー)では、カナダの北極地で雄大な北西アメリカ原住民アートから精妙なイヌイットアートエスキモーアートをご覧にいただくことができます。個々の作品は、信頼すべきオリジナル独創作品でギャラリー・クオリティーです。

オンライン・ギャラリーであることにより、オリジナル・アートワークの典型的な小売価格から20~50%割引価格でご提供することができます。現在のギャラリー作品をご覧になる場合はこちら。

www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca/indexjap.htm 日本語
www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca English


イヌイットアート エスキモーアート

Wednesday, March 08, 2006

Inuit Art and Eskimo Art Website Launches New Japanese Pages for Customers in Japan

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Montreal, Quebec, Canada -- March 9, 2006 – Free Spirit Gallery, a Montreal based online art gallery specializing in Inuit art and Eskimo art, is going international by launching new Japanese pages for its website. Overseas art customers located in Japan can now browse through the many beautiful pieces of art from Canada’s Arctic north in Japanese. Since the popularity of Canadian Inuit art and Eskimo art has been growing internationally, the new Japanese version of Free Spirit Gallery’s website will make it easier for buyers to shop for pieces without even leaving Japan. Free Spirit Gallery ships artwork from Canada directly to Japan and other overseas international locations.

Japanese tourists have always enjoyed Canada for its natural scenic beauty. The Canadian Rockies, Niagara Falls and even the autumn leaves in the trees across Canada have been strong tourist attractions for the visiting Japanese. Canadian Inuit art has been popular acquisitions for the Japanese during their travels to Canada. Through Free Spirit Gallery’s website, they can now continue to build their Inuit art collections from home back in Japan.

There’s even an informative article in the website about recognizing authentic Inuit artwork from reproductions and fakes. This article in both Japanese as well as English, will help educate tourists and novice collectors about Inuit art so that they can make wise buying decisions without ending up with just cheap tourist souvenirs.

Clint Leung, who created Free Spirit Gallery in 2004, says, “Our website is extremely informative and as more of the Japanese market discovers us, we intend to translate more of our information resource articles into Japanese in the future.”

Because of the isolation of the Arctic north, Canadian Inuit artists have always had difficulties in getting their artwork out to the rest of the world. Now with the help of Free Spirit Gallery’s new Japanese website, these talented artists can gain much needed exposure for their beautiful work in Japan, the largest consumer market in Asia.

For additional information, see www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca.

About Free Spirit Gallery:

Free Spirit Gallery is an online gallery specializing in Inuit Eskimo art and Northwest Native American art including carvings, sculptures as well as prints. Free Spirit Gallery has numerous information resource articles with photos of authentic Inuit and Native Indian art as well as free eCards.

Contact Information:

Clint Leung
Free Spirit Gallery
514-421-1124
866-421-1124
http://www.FreeSpiritGallery.ca

###

Tuesday, March 07, 2006

Native Peoples Magazine to Feature Inuit Art

Looks like the May/June issue of Native Peoples Magazine will feature Inuit art. This will be a nice change to the usual southwest Indian art that dominates the Native American art publications in the U.S. Native Peoples is one of the premier magazines covering American Indian art and culture so the new issue will give some well deserved exposure for Canadian Inuit art including the stone carvings from the Arctic.


For more information on Inuit art, see Inuit Art Information Articles.


To see some fine examples of Inuit carvings online now, see Free Spirit Gallery's Inuit Art at their gallery section.

Friday, March 03, 2006

Ex-Beatle Paul McCartney Protests Seal Hunt in Canada

Ex-Beatle Paul McCartney and his wife Heather protested against the harp seal hunt in Canada this week during a visit to Prince Edward Island. McCartney and his wife who is an animal activist, fly out by helicopter to ice floes near Iles-de-la-Madeleine about 160 kilometres northeast of Prince Edward Island where they observed and were photographed with harp seal pups up close. "Previous Canadian governments have allowed this heartbreaking hunt to continue despite the fact that the majority of its citizens ...are opposed to it," the Canadian Press reported the McCartneys as saying at a news conference in Charlottetown.

"We don't want to see the local people suffer," McCartney told the Canadian Press. "But, from what we hear, it is quite a small amount of their annual revenue and this could be easily sorted out by the Canadian government, if they care to do it."

"Canada is known as a great nation," McCartney said in the CP interview. "But this is something that leaves a stain on the character of the Canadian people and we don't think that's right. I don't think the vast amount of Canadians think that's right."

McCartney's trip to Prince Edward Island was arranged by the Humane Society of the United States, which hopes that the media attention will put pressure on the Canadian government to end the annual seal hunt.


For beautiful Inuit art of seals, see Seal Inuit Carvings.

Thursday, March 02, 2006

Inuit Fisherman with Fish Stone Sculpture - New Eskimo Art Soapstone Carving

Here's a very interesting Inuit stone sculpture of a fisherman with fish that just arrived at Free Spirit Gallery. The carver of this piece was Markossie Nappartuk of Akulivik in Nunavik (northern Arctic Quebec). The detail all around this Eskimo art soapstone carving is very nice from the fishes all the way to the fisherman's pants. For more details and photos, see this Inuit art piece at the Other Inuit Sculptures section of the gallery.


inuit stone sculpture eskimo art soapstone carvings

Wednesday, March 01, 2006

Turin Torino Winter Olympics Get Exposed to Canadian Native Culture

Looks like the world recently got exposed to more Canadian Native culture during the Turin Torino Winter Olympics. At the closing ceremonies, there were chiefs from various Northwest Native groups in British Columbia, Canada wearing their traditional clothing inviting the world to Vancouver for the next Winter Olympics in 2010. Dancers also built a huge Inuit inukshuk on stage. The logo with the Inuit inukshuk mascot for the Vancouver Olympic Games was finally flashed on the stage at the end of the Canadian segment. No doubt that people around the world will now be curious as to what the Inuit inukshuk symbol is.


For some interesting background information, see the Inuit Inukshuk article.

See the Vancouver Winter Olympics logo at Inuit Inukshuk Olymic Mascot.

Also see Inuit Inukshuk Sculptures at Free Spirit Gallery.